Wrestling Identities - Race & Gender in postapartheid times | with Zimitri Erasmus & Christi van der Westhuizen
Oct
30
5:00 PM17:00

Wrestling Identities - Race & Gender in postapartheid times | with Zimitri Erasmus & Christi van der Westhuizen

Wrestling Identities - Race & Gender in postapartheid times | with Zimitri Erasmus & Christi van der Westhuizen

October 30, 2018 at 5PM- 7PM

The Visual Identities in Art and Design Research Centre (VIAD) is thrilled to announce this public conversation between Prof Zimitri Erasmus and Prof Christi van der Westhuizen – moderated by SASA Chair Dr Babalwa Magoqwana. Drawing on their recent book publications (see below), Profs Erasmus and van der Westhuizen will probe difficult questions around race and gender in postapartheid South Africa, with a view to facilitating an open, critical and productive dialogue.

Prof Zimitri Erasmus

Prof Christi van der Westhuizen

Dr Babalwa Magoqwana

  Race Otherwise. Forging a New Humanism for South Africa   Zimitri Erasmus   How is ‘race’ determined? Is it your DNA? The community that you were raised in? The way others see you or the way you see yourself?  In Race Otherwise: Forging a New Humanism for South Africa Zimitri Erasmus questions the notion that one can know race with one’s eyes, with racial categories and with genetic ancestry tests. She moves between the intimate probing of racial identities as we experience them individually, and analysis of the global historical forces that have created these identities and woven them into our thinking about what it means to be ‘human’.  Starting from her own family’s journeys through regions of the world and ascribed racial identities, she develops her argument about how it is possible to recognize the pervasiveness of race thinking without submitting to its power. Drawing on the theoretical work of Frantz Fanon, Sylvia Wynter and others, Erasmus argues for a new way of ‘coming to know otherwise’, of seeing the boundaries between racial identities as thresholds to be crossed, through politically charged acts of imagination and love.   “Race Otherwise brings together the full amplitude of Zimitri Erasmus’s thinking about how race works. It tunes into registers both personal and social. It is not without indignation, and not … insensitive to emotion and … the anger inside South Africa. It is a book that is not afraid of questions of affect. Eros and love, Erasmus urges, are not separable from the hard work of thinking.”   — Crain Soudien, CEO of the Human Sciences Research Council, South Africa    Sitting Pretty. White Afrikaans Women in Postapartheid South Africa    Christi van der Westhuizen   At the opening of South Africa’s first democratic parliament in 1994, newly elected president Nelson Mandela issued a clarion call to an unlikely group: white Afrikaans women, who during apartheid occupied the ambivalent position of being both oppressor and oppressed. He conjured the memory of poet Ingrid Jonker as ‘both an Afrikaner and an African’ who ‘instructs that our endeavours must be about the liberation of the woman, the emancipation of the man and the liberty of the child’. More than two decades later, the question is: how have white Afrikaans-speaking women responded to the liberating possibilities of constitutional democracy?  With Afrikaner nationalism in disrepair, and official apartheid in demise, have they re-imagined themselves in opposition to colonial ideas of race, gender, sexuality and class?  Sitting Pretty  explores this postapartheid identity through the concepts of  ordentlikheid , as an ethnic form of respectability, and the  volksmoeder , or mother of the nation, as enduring icon. Issues of intersectionality, space, emotion and masculinity are also investigated.   “Christi van der Westhuizen has pushed the boundaries of intersectionality beyond the current scholarly discourse, and opened up the possibility of a much richer understanding of not only the persistence of the problem of racism; her reflection on how racism and patriarchy interact in the social construction of Afrikaner women’s identity is a compelling vision of how these two systems of domination are critical in our understanding of the oppression of all women. Yet her last word on this most urgent problem of contemporary South Africa is a transformative vision.”   — Pumla Gobodo-Madikizela, Professor and Research Chair, Historical Trauma and Transformation, Stellenbosch University

Race Otherwise. Forging a New Humanism for South Africa
Zimitri Erasmus

How is ‘race’ determined? Is it your DNA? The community that you were raised in? The way others see you or the way you see yourself?

In Race Otherwise: Forging a New Humanism for South Africa Zimitri Erasmus questions the notion that one can know race with one’s eyes, with racial categories and with genetic ancestry tests. She moves between the intimate probing of racial identities as we experience them individually, and analysis of the global historical forces that have created these identities and woven them into our thinking about what it means to be ‘human’.

Starting from her own family’s journeys through regions of the world and ascribed racial identities, she develops her argument about how it is possible to recognize the pervasiveness of race thinking without submitting to its power. Drawing on the theoretical work of Frantz Fanon, Sylvia Wynter and others, Erasmus argues for a new way of ‘coming to know otherwise’, of seeing the boundaries between racial identities as thresholds to be crossed, through politically charged acts of imagination and love.

“Race Otherwise brings together the full amplitude of Zimitri Erasmus’s thinking about how race works. It tunes into registers both personal and social. It is not without indignation, and not … insensitive to emotion and … the anger inside South Africa. It is a book that is not afraid of questions of affect. Eros and love, Erasmus urges, are not separable from the hard work of thinking.”

— Crain Soudien, CEO of the Human Sciences Research Council, South Africa


Sitting Pretty. White Afrikaans Women in Postapartheid South Africa
Christi van der Westhuizen

At the opening of South Africa’s first democratic parliament in 1994, newly elected president Nelson Mandela issued a clarion call to an unlikely group: white Afrikaans women, who during apartheid occupied the ambivalent position of being both oppressor and oppressed. He conjured the memory of poet Ingrid Jonker as ‘both an Afrikaner and an African’ who ‘instructs that our endeavours must be about the liberation of the woman, the emancipation of the man and the liberty of the child’. More than two decades later, the question is: how have white Afrikaans-speaking women responded to the liberating possibilities of constitutional democracy?

With Afrikaner nationalism in disrepair, and official apartheid in demise, have they re-imagined themselves in opposition to colonial ideas of race, gender, sexuality and class? Sitting Pretty explores this postapartheid identity through the concepts of ordentlikheid, as an ethnic form of respectability, and the volksmoeder, or mother of the nation, as enduring icon. Issues of intersectionality, space, emotion and masculinity are also investigated.

“Christi van der Westhuizen has pushed the boundaries of intersectionality beyond the current scholarly discourse, and opened up the possibility of a much richer understanding of not only the persistence of the problem of racism; her reflection on how racism and patriarchy interact in the social construction of Afrikaner women’s identity is a compelling vision of how these two systems of domination are critical in our understanding of the oppression of all women. Yet her last word on this most urgent problem of contemporary South Africa is a transformative vision.”

— Pumla Gobodo-Madikizela, Professor and Research Chair, Historical Trauma and Transformation, Stellenbosch University

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Decolonizing Pedagogy in Arts, Design & Creative Education | with Antonia Darder & friends
Sep
13
6:00 PM18:00

Decolonizing Pedagogy in Arts, Design & Creative Education | with Antonia Darder & friends

VIAD, STAND & UJ Arts & Culture are excited to present a public conversation with Prof Antonia Darder, with responses by Prof David Andrew, Brenden Gray, Rangoato Hlasane & Puleng Plessie. The objective of this gathering is both to engage with Prof Darder around questions of critical pedagogy in arts and design education, and to locate the discussion within the context of current projects and dialogues at work in the city.

Prof Darder’s scholarship has consistently focused on issues of racism, political economy, social justice, and education. Her work critically engages the contributions of Paulo Freire to our understanding of inequalities in schools and society. Darder’s critical theory of biculturalism links questions of culture, power, and pedagogy to social justice concerns in education. Through her decolonizing scholarship on ethics and moral issues, she articulates a critical theory of leadership for social justice and an interpretive methodology, with a focus on the empowerment of subaltern populations. Darder is the author of numerous books and holds the Leavey Presidential Endowed Chair of Ethics and Moral Leadership at Loyola Marymount University, Los Angeles; is Distinguished Visiting Professor of Education at University of Johannesburg; and Professor Emerita of Education Policy, Organisation, and Leadership at the University of Illinois Urbana Champaign.

For more information on Antonia Darder, visit www.darder.org

David Andrew is Associate Professor and Head of the Division of Visual Arts at the Wits School of Arts. He is an artist and lectures in Fine Arts and Arts Education courses at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels. Current research interests include the tracking of histories of arts education in South Africa and southern Africa more broadly; the Another Road Map School international research project and the reimagining of the arts school and artistic research in the context of the Global South. He was a member of the task team for the first NEPAD Regional Conference on Arts Education in Africa (Johannesburg, South Africa, 2015) and participated in the second NEPAD Regional Conference on Arts Education in Africa held in Cairo, Egypt, May 2017.

Brenden Gray is the Head of the Department of Graphic Design at the University of Johannesburg where he teaches on the Communication Design programme and on PGCE Visual Arts Methodology course. His research centers on the construction of social class in creative education and explores design and design discourses under neoliberal capitalism. His doctoral study examines the praxis and creativity of working class learners in public schools in Johannesburg. Gray is the founder and convener of STAND (Scholarship of Teaching in Art and Design) and is presently co-editing a book on critical pedagogy in South African creative and arts education.

Rangoato Hlasane is a cultural worker, writer, archivist, DJ and co-founder of Keleketla! Library, as well as a lecturer at the University of the Witwatersrand. He is committed to ‘art/s education’ with a social justice agenda. The importance to him of publishing on education is evident in the Keleketla! Library book, 58 Years to the Treason Trial: Intergenerational Dialogue as a tool for Learning (2014). Rangoato is also an active member of ARAC (Another Roadmap Africa Cluster). As Mma Tseleng, he has presented sonic lectures at events such as the Under the Mango Tree gathering of documenta 14 (2017), Kassel, The Night School (2017), Vienna and The World Show on Kaya FM (2017) amongst others.

Puleng Plessie is the Founding Director for a non-profit organisation called Keep the Dream Arts which is responsible for community art education in Johannesburg. She is part of the Johannesburg Working Group of Another Road map School, a global network which analyses polices in arts education. Plessie was recently invited to contribute to a research edited volume entitled Critical Pedagogies in South African Visual Culture (2018). Her research interest explores the notion of facilitating through dialogue to improve pedagogy by localising content and introducing different IsiZulu terminologies used to reimagine the language and practices associated with arts education such as Inkulumo-Mpendulwano.

This conversation is presented as a collaboration between the Visual Identities in Art and Design Research Centre (VIAD) and Scholarship of Teaching in Art and Design (STAND).

www.viad.co.za

www.standgroup.wordpress.com

Special thanks to UJ Arts & Culture and the UJ Faculty of Education.

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Lesser Violence Reading Group, Session 1
Aug
29
6:00 PM18:00

Lesser Violence Reading Group, Session 1

SESSION 1 / 29 AUGUST 2018 / 18:00
with Gabrielle Goliath & Nondumiso Msimanga
PERFORMING THE WORK OF MOURNING: 
ETHICS & THE REPRESENTATION OF GENDERED/SEXUALISED VIOLENCE

The Lesser Violence Reading Group is envisioned as an open and interdisciplinary discursive space, organised by GALA (Gay and Lesbian Memory in Action) and VIAD (Visual Identities in Art and Design, UJ).

Over the course of four interactive sessions, a group of (maximum fifteen) participants will be guided through readings that cover the broad subjects of gender, sexuality, violence and visuality, with an emphasis on performance. These discussions will be located within a contemporary South African context, and in dialogue with concurrent discourses from the continent and its diaspora. Each session will be led by a different group of invited presenters from a variety of fields including, but not limited to: activism and social justice, art, performance, theatre, and journalism.

Through the Reading Group programme, GALA and VIAD hope to bring together gender activists and artists in a comfortable and intimate setting, in which conversation around these sensitive topics may be allowed to flourish. Equally, the reading sessions are an opportunity to engage with innovative texts, writers and theorists from South Africa and the continent.

‘Readings’ are not limited to academic texts, but can include films, images, music and sound, as well as newspaper and magazine articles.

Participants are welcome from any field, and from any point in their education. The sessions are intended for all who would like to further their intersectional understanding, and would like to meet with like-minded individuals.

All the best,

GALA and VIAD

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'Rhetorics of Resistance' book launch & conversation
Aug
2
6:00 PM18:00

'Rhetorics of Resistance' book launch & conversation

Reflecting on modes of resistance employed by opposition newspapers in Apartheid South Africa, Bryan Trabold will be in conversation with former Political Editor of the New Nation Enoch Sithole, and joint founder and editor of the Weekly Mail Irwin Manoim.

About the book:
The period of apartheid was a perilous time in South Africa’s history. Rhetorics of Resistance examines the tactics of resistance developed by those working for the Weekly Mail and New Nation, two opposition newspapers published in South Africa in the 1980s. The government, in an attempt to crack down on political resistance, had imposed martial law and even greater restrictions on the press. Bryan Trabold examines the writing, legal, and political strategies developed by those working for these newspapers to challenge the censorship restrictions. Despite the many steps taken by the government to silence them, including detaining the editor of New Nation for two years and temporarily closing both newspapers, theWeekly Mail and New Nation not only continued to publish but also increased their circulations and obtained strong domestic and international support. New Nation ceased publication in 1994 after South Africa made the transition to democracy, but the Weekly Mail, now the Mail & Guardian, continues to publish and remains one of South Africa’s most respected newspapers.
 
Bryan Trabold is an Associate Professor of English at Suffolk University in Boston, MA, and a Research Associate at the Visual Identities in Art and Design Research Centre (VIAD), University of Johannesburg.  His recently released book from the University of Pittsburgh Press, Rhetorics of Resistance: Opposition Journalism in Apartheid South Africa, examines the tactics of resistance developed by those working for the Weekly Mail and New Nation published in South Africa in the mid- and late 1980s. Trabold has also published articles in South African Historical Journal, African Journalism Studies, College English, and College Composition and Communication.

 

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SOUNDINGS | Black Sonic Archives
Apr
12
8:30 PM20:30

SOUNDINGS | Black Sonic Archives

Composers in Conversation
Thuthuka Sibisi & Philip Miller

In this conversation, South African composers Thuthuka Sibisi and Philip Miller discuss their recent composition – a musical arrangement for the image-sound installation, entitled, The African Choir 1891 Re-Imagined, which forms part of the exhibition Black Chronicles IV, exhibited at the FADA Gallery, University of Johannesburg (2018); the Apartheid Museum (2017, Johannesburg) and Iziko South African National Gallery (2017, Cape Town). The African Choir 1891 Re-Imagined tells the story of a group of 16 South African singers who travelled to Victorian England in 1891 to raise money for a technical college back home. Over two years, Sibisi and Miller worked with 15 contemporary singers in Cape Town to compose five songs, drawing from the original repertoire.

 

PUNGWE SOUND TRAILS
Future Sonic Ontologies: Cowbell Mixtapes as Sonic Incursions
Robert Machiri & Elsa M’bala

In his performance, entitled, PUNGWE SOUND TRAILS, Future Sonic Ontologies: Cowbell Mixtapes as Sonic Incursions, Robert Machiri (a.k.a Chi), draws on contemporary digital technologies to explore how sound performance can re-map spaces and histories in the contemporary moment. Using cowbells to represent a precolonial sonic archive of knowledge, Pungwe engages with remixing to consider questions of authenticity, adaptation and transformation. Chi downloads samples from the International Library of African Music website, and utilises them as the basis for a sound performance, which is intended to portray a frenzied state of mind. Drawing on the ideology of remixing, Chi interrogates colonial framings of African music to liberate them from the reductive subjection of the archive.

 

Sonic Bridges
Thembinkosi Goniwe
With collaborating musicians:
Andile Yenana (piano); Feya Faku (trumpet); Titi Luziphdo (vocals) & guests.
Photographic images by Andrew Tshabangu

Looking at Tshabangu’s photographs, not only do we see but also hear sounds and imagine sounds, rhythms, melody and beats. We witness both silence and sonic manifestations … (Thembinkosi Goniwe)

In Sonic Bridges, curator and artist Thembinkosi Goniwe has commissioned a remarkable, impromptu jazz quintet to respond to, look at, listen to, and interpret, a selection of photographic images from South African photographer, Andrew Tshabangu’s seminal Bridges (2008-) series. Through sonic mediums, the musicians evoke the praying, chanting, preaching, marching and dancing of worshippers documented in the projected images, which focus on religious and spiritual rituals performed in unusual, often make-shift contexts. One of the key photographs to be performed is Tribute to the Ancestors of the Middle Passage, shot in New York in 1999. This particular photograph is engaged with and performed through Dianne Reeves’ song, Bridges, after which Tshabangu’s Bridges series is named.

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Dr Cheryl Finley "Of Soul And Joy Workshop"
Apr
10
2:00 PM14:00

Dr Cheryl Finley "Of Soul And Joy Workshop"

Dr Cheryl Finley "Of Soul And Joy Workshop"

Tuesday, April 10, 2018

2:00PM - 5:00PM

VIAD & Of Soul and Joy are excited to present a private workshop and conversation with Dr Cheryl Finley. The objective of this gathering is both to engage with Dr Finley around questions of photography with the students in Thokoza.

Cheryl Finley

Cheryl Finley is Associate Professor of Art History in the Department of the History of Art and Visual Studies at Cornell University in the United States. She holds a Ph.D. in African American Studies and History of Art from Yale University. She is the author of the monograph, Committed to Memory: the Art of the Slave Ship Icon, the first in depth study of the most famous image associated with the memory of slavery (Princeton University Press, 2018) and contributor to My Soul Has Grown Deep: Black Art from the American South (Yale University Press, 2018), which accompanies the exhibition History Refused to Die: Highlights from the Souls Grown Deep Foundation on view at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York through September 23, 2018.

Of Soul & Joy Photography Project

In 2012, Of Soul & Joy Photography Project brought a photography project to the Buhlebuzile Secondary School in the eastern Johannesburg township of Thokoza. The initiative intends to be a visual platform and a skills development programme for the learners. This project is based on workshops run by international professional photographers, encounters with the art market and artistic events. Every year, Rubis Mécénat Cultural Fund and Easigas sponsor the photography studies of three gifted students of the project at the Market Photo Workshop in Johannesburg, a prestigious photography school founded in 1989 by David Goldblatt, to ensure their future in photography.

For more info on the project , the events, the photographers, check

http://www.rubismecenat.fr/of-soul-and-joy-project/?lang=en

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Of-Soul-Joy-Project-In-Thokoza/150677718402152

This conversation is presented as a collaboration between the Visual Identities in Art and Design Research Centre (VIAD) and “Of Soul and Joy” .

www.viad.co.za

Special thanks to Jabulani Dhlamini and Dr Cheryl Finley

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'Inhabiting the Frame', colloquium: 9 - 10 October 2017
Oct
9
to Oct 10

'Inhabiting the Frame', colloquium: 9 - 10 October 2017

Responding to the exhibition, Priya Ramrakha: A Pan African Perspective, 1950-1968 (FADA Gallery, October 2017), VIAD hosted an intimate colloquium entitled, Inhabiting the Frame - Documentary & Dubjectivity in the Anti/Post/Colonial Visual Archive. Running from 9 - 10 October, 2017 (FADA Gallery), conversations in the colloquium engaged with questions of agency, subjectivity and the implicit politics and 'ethical demands' of photo-documentary, in relation to anti-colonial and postcolonial struggles in Africa.

Participants included: Omar Badsha, Rory Bester, Linda Chernis, Khwezi Gule, Pamila Gupta, Keval Harie, Erin Haney, Patricia Hayes, Natasha Himmelman, Cynthia Kros, Bronwyn Law-Viljoen, John Edwin Mason, Peter McKenzie, Geoffrey Ogwaro, Sethembile Msezane, Dan Ojwang, Shravan Vidyarthi and Paul Weinberg.

Photographer and former Afrapix member, Peter McKenzie, passed away just two days after the colloquium, where he presented a thought-provoking paper on teaching the history of African photography. On behalf of all those who participated in the colloquium programme - many of whom were personal friends and colleagues - VIAD would like to acknowledge Peter's warm and generous personality, as well as his seminal contribution to photographic practice and pedagogy in South Africa.

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'PRIYA RAMRAKHA: A Pan-African Perspective, 1950-1968', exhibition opening: 5 October 2017
Oct
5
6:00 PM18:00

'PRIYA RAMRAKHA: A Pan-African Perspective, 1950-1968', exhibition opening: 5 October 2017

5 October - 1 November 2017 | FADA Gallery

Curated by Erin Haney & Shravan Vidyarthi, in collaboration with the Visual Identities in Art and Design Research Centre (VIAD)

In collaboration with curators Dr. Erin Haney and Shravan Vidyarthi, VIAD recently presented the first comprehensive survey of images by pioneering Indian-Kenyan photojournalist Priya Ramrakha. Following the recent recovery of his archive in Nairobi, and the production of African Lens (2008) – an award-winning documentary by Shravan Vidyarthi – the photographs on exhibition tracked Ramrakha’s global travels in the 1950s and 1960s, and his sensitive chronicling of anti-colonial and post-independence struggles in Africa, the Middle East and the United States.

Seeking to address the largely unacknowledged contribution of Ramrakha’s visual commentary, this important exhibition afforded viewers an opportunity to reconsider the ethical imperatives and dilemmas of photographic journalism, in relation to the complex disentanglement of Africa from colonial rule, and to reflect on that history as layered by multiple human experiences.

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'isiShweshwe', book launch: 14 September 2017
Sep
14
6:00 PM18:00

'isiShweshwe', book launch: 14 September 2017

On 14 September, 2017, VIAD hosted the Johannesburg launch of isishweshwe: A history of the Indigenisation of Blueprint in South Africa, written by VIAD Research Associate Juliette Leeb-du Toit. In a landmark account of the social history of isishweshwe, Leeb-du Toit chronicles the influence and use of indigo, the fabric’s initial emergence in Europe, and its journey via ship and trade to the shores of South Africa in the 17th and 18thcenturies. The book launch was accompanied by an exhibition of works by contemporary South African artists Senzeni Marasela and Siwa Mgoboza.

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'Lesser Violence', panel discussion: 31 August 2017
Aug
31
7:00 PM19:00

'Lesser Violence', panel discussion: 31 August 2017

On Thursday 31 August (the last day of Women’s Month), VIAD and GALA (Gay and Lesbian Memory in Action) jointly hosted an intimate discussion around performance art practices as modes of addressing the problematic of gendered violence and rape culture in South Africa. Moderated by VIAD curator and researcher, Amie Soudien, the panel included artists Donna Kukama, Gabrielle Goliath, Nondumiso Msimanga and Senzeni Marasela.

The discussion brought together a community of artists, curators, researchers, activists and writers with a shared interest in gender rights, and with a view to initiating dialogue around artistic strategies for working with, through, around and against enactments of gendered and sexualised violence, and their systemic perpetuation. With the support of GALA ,and other partners, VIAD is planning a related performance program for 2018.

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'DID SOMEONE SAY DECOLONISATION? DID SOMEONE SAY FREEDOM?' with Prof Anthony Bogues & Prof Handel Wright: 11 August 2017
Aug
11
7:00 PM19:00

'DID SOMEONE SAY DECOLONISATION? DID SOMEONE SAY FREEDOM?' with Prof Anthony Bogues & Prof Handel Wright: 11 August 2017

On Wednesday 16 August, 2017, VIAD hosted an evening of presentations and discussion with Professors Anthony Bogues and Handel Kashope Wright. Having interacted with FADA students in a series of student-led seminars on ‘Decolonizing Forward’, Bogues and Wright presented individual reflections on key issues and challenges around decolonisation, in relation to pedagogy and the university project, as well as to notions of freedom and the radical imagination. Presentations were followed by a conversation and Q&A session, moderated by UJ PhD candidate Thabang Monoa.

Anthony Bogues is Professor of Humanities and Critical Theory as well as Africana Studies at Brown University. He is also the Director of the Centre for the Study of Slavery and Justice at Brown University.

Handel Kashope Wright is Professor and Director of the Centre for Culture, Identity & Education at the University of British Columbia.

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'Promises and Lies - The ANC, Exile, and the Project of Freedom', exhibition opening: 11 May 2017
May
11
6:00 PM18:00

'Promises and Lies - The ANC, Exile, and the Project of Freedom', exhibition opening: 11 May 2017

11 May - 4 June 2017 | FADA Gallery
Curated by Dr Siona O'Connell, in collaboration with the Visual Identities in Art and Design Research Centre (VIAD)

In this timeous exhibition, curator Siona O'Connell critically re-presented a recently uncovered archive of photographs by award-winning British photographer Laurie Sparham, chronicling the experience of ANC exiles living in Tanzania and Zambia from 1989-1990. Featuring a provocative new documentary by O’Connell, titled Promises & Lies – Fault Lines in the ANC, the exhibition offered viewers a chance to consider the sacrifices and aspirations of political exile, and to rethink the promises of freedom it represented, in relation to a current landscape of crisis and failure in which we, as ‘new South Africans’, find ourselves complicit. Situating the images in conversation with key extracts from the Freedom Charter, audiences were asked to think about links and traces, aspirations and accountability – and, for O'Connell, "difficult questions we must ask of history and its resonances in the present".

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'Promises and Lies - Fault Lines in the ANC', documentary premiere: 4 May 2017
May
4
6:00 PM18:00

'Promises and Lies - Fault Lines in the ANC', documentary premiere: 4 May 2017

On the 4th of May, 2017, VIAD hosted the premiere of Dr Siona O’Connell’s provocative documentary, Promises & Lies – Fault Lines in the ANC. The premiere was screened in the tented pavilion on Constitution Hill, and was opened with an address by former Finance Minister Mr. Pravin Gordhan.

As an exercise in collective self-criticism, Promises & Lies – Fault Lines in the ANC asks difficult questions around collective memory, accountability and the ongoing demand for active citizenry – encouraging viewers to rethink histories of liberation struggle in relation to what O’Connell describes as an, “as of yet unrealised freedom”.

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